Daily Topic for July 19, 2010

2 Kings 3:27
Then he took his firstborn son, who was to succeed him as king, and offered him as a sacrifice on the city wall. The fury against Israel was great; they withdrew and returned to their own land.

In this passage, we have a grim reminder of the connection between witchcraft and blood sacrifice. What a tragic combination it is! Though God is sovereign, the powers of hell try to gain advantage as they did in this passage. The Naruo people, likewise, look to such empty gods for their blessings.


Pray that the Naruo people will soon understand that they must look only to Jehovah Jireh as their provider.

Naruo of China

by AK

“Maybe this year,” a young husband pulled his tearful wife close. They lit incense and offered a sacrifice to the spirits. She remembered the baby girl she never had a chance to hold. The mid-wife said it would be easier that way, but it didn’t seem easy when the midwife suffocated the newborn. She would never forget her first born, who would never nurse at her leaking breasts.

China’s one-child policy leaves many empty arms, as some baby girls are not allowed to live. The Naruos pray and offer sacrifices to evil spirits, asking for baby boys. Girls born to them are not valued. Yet, the Almighty Creator counts each one as His own special treasure. He has a purpose for everyone!

The Naruo people are a small group of about 15,000. They are one of more than 100 Yi subgroups in Yunnan Province. The tribe has not been specifically targeted by missionaries and has no known Christ followers. They worship spirits. In the 1800s, Welsh missionary Griffin John cried, “Shall not China remain in its state of darkness and death because of the worldliness and deadness of the people of God?” We must answer, “No!” We care about the Naruo people. We will pray, and God will answer.

Learn more at joshuaproject.net

Ask our faithful Father to reveal His truth to the Naruo people. Pray that they will accept the light and life He offers.


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